Harvard University Social Media and Vaccine Hesitancy Article Summary & Proposal Paper

Harvard University Social Media and Vaccine Hesitancy Article Summary & Proposal Harvard University Social Media and Vaccine Hesitancy Article Summary & Proposal ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL NURSING PAPERS Unformatted Attachment Preview Raymond Brennan EWRT 2 18 October 2020 Essay One Proposal Instructor’s Approval 1.) My paper will suggest that allowing students to effectively “opt out” of conversations that make them uncomfortable is another step down the road that has already seen feelings treated as truths and requires self-esteem and effort be considered when grades are assigned. Should this latest anti-intellectual fad continue to spread, it will mean that the term “higher education” will need to be replaced with the term “high-priced ostrich training,” or “mindlessness perfected at for great price.” 2.) Requiring institutions of higher learning to provide a “safe-space” where students can avoid any conversation or course that makes them the least bit uncomfortable is the logical next concession made to the overly protected and massively entitled young people who view a college education as a necessary purchase prior to beginning careers or families, and if this concession is broadly made, the term higher education will become an oxymoron. 3.) My audience is other college students who have not read my source material but who are interested in my topic and want to make an informed decision about where they stand on the issue I discuss. 4.) Introduction It is with very little surprise or outrage that institutions of higher learning across the country have begun to kowtow to the demands of students who insist they be allowed an effective veto over the content of their educations. That the students—and their parents— would demand such a veto comes as no surprise, of course, as many, if not most parents have had the ability to shield their children from dangerous, potentially terrifying ideas or concepts for the past two decades as can proved by even a cursory look at what classes a child can be excused from in many a public middle or high school with sex education and biology the two courses most frequently avoided. Saved from the dangerous knowledge of evolutionary theory and the consequences of sexual activity, it should come as no surprise to learn that many of the same young people now wish to be cossetted from other ideas and conversations they perceive as threats to their autonomy or selfhood, to their worldview, or to their perceptions and assumptions. This new “safe-space” movement began—as did the political correctness movement of the 1970s—in elite eastern schools. Harvard University Social Media and Vaccine Hesitancy Article Summary & Proposal Paper That schools such as Brown, Columbia, and Yale have so cravenly capitulated to students’ insistence on protection from discomfiting ideas and potential threats—they can only be potential as students flee before the ideas can be articulated because they “know” this or that idea will traumatize them should they have to hear opinions about it expressed or debated—suggests that other, “lesser” schools will follow the lead of the elites. But perhaps it is worth considering whether such protection is absolutely necessary or even beneficial to those who clamor so loudly for it. Requiring institutions of higher learning to provide a “safe-space” wherein students can avoid any conversation or course that makes them the least bit uncomfortable is the logical next concession made to the overly protected and massively entitled young people who view a college education merely as a necessary purchase prior to beginning careers or families, and if this concession is broadly given, the concept of higher education will become an oxymoron. 5.) Works Cited Brooks, David. “The Campus Crusaders.” The New York Times. June 2, 2015. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/02/opinion/david-brooks-the-campus-crusaders.html?src=xps&_r=0. Accessed 22 November 2015. Bruni, Frank. “College, Poetry, and Purpose.” The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/18/opinion/frank-bruni-college-poetry-and-purpose.html?src=xps. Accessed 22 November 2015. Moran, Rick. “Columbia Student in Anguish Because She Has to Read Books by White People.” PJ Media.com. 20 November 2015. https://pjmedia.com/trending/2015/11/20/columbia-student-inanguish-because-she-has-to-read-books-by-white-people Shulevitz, Judith. “In College and Hiding From Scary Ideas.” The New York Times. March 21, 2015. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/opinion/sunday/judith-shulevitz-hiding-from-scaryideas.html?src=xps. Accessed 22 November 2015. Then, just to give an example, my first body paragraph would start with something like this: Most of western culture and history has viewed the notion of a university education as an experience one seeks in pursuit of sharpening one’s faculties of critical, analytical thinking and broadening one’s worldview. After all, “Education,” as the great French essayist Montaigne so famously said, “is an iterative process.” Just as one would not conceive of honing a knife on a nerf ball, it seems equally inconceivable that one would expect to sharpen one’s wits in a protective bubble, a safe-space. Raymond Brennan Eng 1C-106 July 2020 Summary 1 Kristof, Nicholas. “U.S.A., Land of Limitations?” New York Times. August 8, 2015. Web. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/opinion/sunday/nicholas-kristof-usa-landoflimitations.html. Accessed October 12, 2015. In his New York Times opinion column, “U.S.A., Land of Limitations?”, Nicholas Kristof argues that America’s current lack of economic mobility and its noticeably absent level playing field for economic opportunity are what presidential aspirants need to acknowledge and confront. Admitting that the cherished belief in America as a land of opportunity was once true, the author claims this is no longer the case.Harvard University Social Media and Vaccine Hesitancy Article Summary & Proposal Paper Today, economic “success is not a sign of virtue. It’s mostly a sign that your grandparents did well.” Citing multiple sources, including a large Pew study of “Economic Mobility Across Generations,” Kristof makes the point that social mobility in the U.S., particularly intergenerational economic mobility, now lags significantly behind Canada and most European societies. Modern America has become the rigid, class stratified society that the founders and subsequent waves of immigrants fled. The article’s centerpiece is Kristof’s recounting the difficult life and tragic death of his childhood friend, Rick Goff, who died because he opted to pay to get his ex-wife’s car back from a tow lot in lieu of refilling the medication he was on for a serious illness. He admits Goff made some poor choices in life, but ultimately, “what distinguished Rick wasn’t primarily bad choices, but intelligence, hard work and lack of opportunity.” The consequences of this lack of opportunity caused by an “income gulf” is what Kristof wants politicians and his readers to understand. While America has made great strides in reducing the race gap in test scores, the “class gap” has grown significantly and is now “almost twice that of the race gap,” which means educational attainment is no longer the readily accessible escalator to bettering one’s economic status, as proven by the fact that “77 percent of adults in the top 25 percent of incomes earn a B.A. by age 24. Only 9 percent of those in the bottom 25 percent do so.” It is not only that lack of educational attainment that hobbles the underclasses, but also the absence of a level playing field that would allow for economic opportunity regardless of education. Intergenerational economic success correlates to class as the height of parents does to their offspring. “The chance of a person who was born to a family in the bottom 10 percent of the income distribution rising to the top 10 percent as an adult is about the same as the chance that a dad who is 5 feet 6 inches tall having a son who grows up to be over 6 feet 1 inch tall,” reports Princeton economist Alan Krueger. This suggests that while the commonly held belief that economic success is all about “choices” and “personal responsibility,” may be true in part, Kristof explains such reasoning fails to consider how “disadvantage is less about income than environment.” The pernicious, long-term effects stemming from a disadvantaged, impoverished environment are impacting more Americans than ever as “more children in America live in poverty now (22 percent at last count) than at the start of the financial crisis in 2008 (18 percent).” To enable the poor to claw their way up the economic ladder requires the political will to speak honestly about the causes and consequences of inequality and the lack of opportunity that arises as a result. What is not helpful in conversations about income inequality is the facile blame-the-victim rhetoric emanating from many quarters of the American landscape. This allows one to dismiss the poor as “entitlement chumps” in musician Ted Nugent’s words, or as a collective “toenail fungus” in society in the words conservative author Neal Boortz. Such soundbites play well on the political stage, and Kristof acknowledges that social programs intended to help the poor are fair game for discussion and debate, but he thinks at least as much attention ought to be paid to the entitlements of the very wealthy who, for example, take $12 billion a year in deductions for subsidized meals and nearly as much for donations to their private museums and art galleries. Harvard University Social Media and Vaccine Hesitancy Article Summary & Proposal Paper Kristof closes with an appeal for politicians to drop the long discredited social Darwinist arguments in favor of an honest and robust exploration of how a land of opportunity has morphed into a class-bound one with an increasing divergence between the have and have-nots. Only when that is understood will there be any chance to recreate the level playing field that allowed his and so many others’ ancestors to start with nothing and thrive. Proposal Instructions Please use this example as a template for your proposal. Your proposal should be numbered as below, and except for item three, each item should be completed in your own words. See the sample proposal. Name block here. Instructor’s Approval:_________________ 1. Provide a narrative description of what your paper will argue. This is simply two or three sentences in your own words describing the argument you intend to make. (This is the only chance you have to use the first person.) Example: My paper will suggest that allowing students to effectively “opt out” of conversations that make them uncomfortable is another step down the road that has already seen feelings treated as truths and requires self-esteem and effort be considered when grades are assigned. Should this latest anti-intellectual fad continue to spread, it will mean that the term “higher education” will need to be replaced with the term “high-priced ostrich training,” or “mindlessness perfected at for great price.” 2. Tentative Thesis. Remember: A thesis is only one sentence, and it ends your introduction. It is not a question, an announcement, or a simple statement of fact. Since you are writing an argument, your thesis should unequivocally state your position. (Subsequent paragraphs will offer the claims, evidence, and reasoning that supports your thesis.) Example: Requiring institutions of higher learning to provide a “safe-space” where students can avoid any conversation or course that makes them the least bit uncomfortable is the logical next concession made to the overly protected and massively entitled young people who view a college education as a necessary purchase prior to beginning careers or families, and if this concession is broadly made, the term higher education will become an oxymoron. 3. Audience Statement. Copy the following word-for-word and paste it in point three of your proposal: My audience is other college students who have not read my source material but who are interested in my topic and want to make an informed decision about where they stand on the issue I discuss. 4. Introduction to your paper. Write the introductory paragraph to the paper you described in Point 1, above. The introduction should not contain any source material unless it is the brief mention of a significant fact necessary to make your thesis understandable.Harvard University Social Media and Vaccine Hesitancy Article Summary & Proposal Paper This introductory paragraph should pique your audience’s interest, giving him or her enough information and background so your thesis claim ends the paragraph, it will emerge organically and will inform the reader what to expect in subsequent paragraphs. Your thesis in this sample introduction should be exactly the same as what is in Point 2, above. A well-developed introductory paragraph will take up at least half of the first page. 5. Works Cited. Beneath your introduction and under a properly centered Works Cited heading, list a couple of tentative sources you intend to use for your paper properly formatted per MLA guidelines. NOTE: Your proposal must be turned in and approved before you begin to write your essay. Failure to turn it in on time will accrue a 5% penalty on the paper’s final grade. A first draft that has not had an approved (passing) proposal will not be accepted. Summary Writing ASSIGNMENT OVERVIEW. A summary is a distillation of an original non-fiction work, like an essay, an article, or a chapter from a book. A well-written summary proves an understanding of the argument or essential ideas in the original text without being a mere collection of quotations or an extended paraphrase. GENERAL GUIDELINES. A well-written summary will use few quotations, but a partial sentence quotation that encapsulates the essay’s main idea or argument is often imbedded in the first sentence (see below). A few other quotations may be needed, but these should be relatively short and embedded in your own sentences. Since a summary is intended to convey only the essence of an article or essay, do not restate detailed examples offered in support of particular ideas. Note only the main ideas. The ideas presented in a summary do not necessarily appear in the same order as they did in the original article, but are instead presented in their order of importance or as necessary to explain the chain of the argument or points being made. To ensure the audience knows that the ideas being summarized are not yours, you should use occasional references to the original author by last name or gender specific pronoun as appropriate. TRANSPARENCY. A summary should be a clear distillation of an author’s ideas. Do not critique or praise the author’s ideas. Do not editorialize, interpret, or take sides; nor should you use the first person singular—I, me, or my. TITLING A SUMMARY. The title of a summary assignment is its work cited entry, which is placed one-line space below your single-spaced name block. For example: Kristof, Nicholas. “U.S.A., Land of Limitations?” New York Times. August 8, 2015. Web. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/opinion/sunday/nicholas-kristof-usa-landof-limitations.html. Accessed October 12, 2015. BEGINNING A SUMMARY. All summaries begin with a first sentence that contains three things: the full title of the piece being summarized as well as its author’s full name— first and last—and his or her key point, idea, or argument. For example: In his New York Times opinion column, “U.S.A., Land of Limitations?”, Nicholas Kristof argues that America’s current lack of economic mobility and its noticeably absent level playing field for economic opportunity, and the fact that “disadvantage is less about income than environment” are what presidential aspirants need to acknowledge and confront. THE LENGTH QUESTION. An often cited rule of thumb for summary writing is that one should be ¼ – ½ of the original. This rule is subject to qualification, of course. A particularly dense article will require more work—length—to summarize than a fairly simple argument. A FINAL NOTE. In addition to being evaluated for standard academic English, a summary’s grade is also based on evidence of a clear understanding of what the author is arguing, and the relationships and importance of his or her ideas. … Purchase answer to see full attachment Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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