Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center

Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center ORDER NOW FOR CUSTOMIZED AND ORIGINAL ESSAY PAPERS ON Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center Please see the attachment with the assignment directions. The 2nd attachment is the case study that is needed in order to answer the question for the assignment. Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center jwi_551_assignment_2.pdf virginia_mason_medical_center.pdf JWI 551: It’s All About the Patient: Improving the Patient Experience Academic Submissions and Evaluations Assignment 2: HBS Case Study—Virginia Mason Medical Center Due by Sunday, Midnight of Week 6 For this assignment, you will read and analyze a Case Study about a major project to transform safety, quality of care, and the patient experience at the Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Gary Kaplan, the CEO of Virginia Mason, led the implementation of the new management system, which was based on the Toyota Production System (TPS) – Lean model. The new system was named the Virginia Mason Production System (VMPS). In your paper, you will evaluate and analyze the challenges faced by Virginia Mason, assess the advantages and disadvantages of the new approach, and describe the impact of VMPS on patient services and the patient experience at Virginia Mason. Instructions Write a 6 to 8 page paper that analyzes the Virginia Mason Case Study. Be sure to answer the questions below in your paper: 1. Describe two key challenges Dr. Kaplan faced in implementing VMPS at Virginia Mason. Name two actions taken to overcome those challenges and implement the new system. 2. Articulate the value proposition guiding the decision to implement VMPS. Describe at least two ways in which this approach adds value to patient services. Be specific with your examples and justify your choices. 3. Identify and describe an unintended consequence of this effort. Was this consequence positive or negative? 4. What has the implementation of VMPS meant for the delivery of Healthcare at Virginia Mason? How has it impacted the patient experience? Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: • • •Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center Typed, double-spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides. Include a Cover page containing the assignment title, student’s name, professor’s name, course title, and date. Include a References page in a format appropriate for any business or academic setting. Note: The Cover and References pages are not included in the required page length. © Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 551 – Assignment 2 (1196) Page 1 of 3 JWI 551: It’s All About the Patient: Improving the Patient Experience Academic Submissions and Evaluations RUBRIC – Assignment 2: HBS Case Study—Virginia Mason Medical Center CRITERIA 1. Describe 2 key challenges Dr. Kaplan faced implementing the VPMS at Virginia Mason Medical Center and 2 actions he took to overcome them. Unsatisfactory Low Pass Pass High Pass Honors Does not describe 2 key challenges Dr. Kaplan faced implementing the VPMS at Virginia Mason and 2 actions he took to overcome them. Describes less than 2 key challenges Dr. Kaplan faced implementing the VPMS at Virginia Mason and less than 2 actions he took to overcome them. Describes 2 key challenges Dr. Kaplan faced implementing the VPMS at Virginia Mason and 2 actions he took to overcome them. Limited details. Fully describes 2 key challenges Dr. Kaplan faced implementing the VPMS at Virginia Mason and 2 actions he took to overcome them. Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center Thoroughly describes 2 key challenges Dr. Kaplan faced implementing the VPMS at Virginia Mason and 2 actions he took to overcome them. Each was fully explained. Does not articulate the value proposition guiding the decision to implement VPMS. No description of how the approach adds value to patient services. Partially articulates the value proposition guiding the decision to implement VPMS. Limited description of how the approach adds value to patient services. Basic articulation of the value proposition guiding the decision to implement VPMS. Basic description of how the approach adds value to patient services. Fully articulates the value proposition guiding the decision to implement VPMS. Description of two ways in which this approach adds value to patient services. Fully and completely articulates the value proposition guiding the decision to implement VPMS. Describes in detail two ways in which this approach adds value to patient services. Does not identify and describe an unintended consequence of this effort. No reference to positive or negative. Partially describes an unintended consequence of this effort. States it as being positive or negative. Identifies and describes an unintended consequence of this effort. States it as being positive or negative Identifies and clearly describes an unintended consequence of this effort. States it as being positive or negative. Identifies and fully describes an unintended consequence of this effort. States it is as being positive or negative and why. Weight: 20% 2. Articulate the value proposition guiding the decision to implement the VPMS. Describe at least two ways in which this approach adds value to patient services. Weight: 20% 3. Identify and describe an unintended consequence of this effort. Was this positive or negative? Weight: 20% © Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 551 – Assignment 2 (1196) Page 2 of 3 JWI 551: It’s All About the Patient: Improving the Patient Experience Academic Submissions and Evaluations 4. Describe what implementation of VMPS has meant for the delivery of Healthcare at Virginia Mason. How has it impacted the patient experience? Does not describe what VMPS has meant for the delivery of Healthcare at Virginia Mason. Does not describe impact on the patient experience. Partially describes what VPMS has meant for the delivery of Healthcare at Virginia Mason. Partially described impact on the patient experience. Describes what VPMS has meant for the delivery of Healthcare at Virginia Mason and impact on the patient experience. Fully describes what VPMS has meant for the delivery of Healthcare at Virginia Mason and impact on the patient experience. Thoroughly describes what VPMS has meant for the delivery of Healthcare at Virginia Mason. Provides detailed information about impact on the patient experience. Multiple mechanical errors; much of the text is difficult to understand or the text does not flow; fails to follow formatting instructions. Several mechanical errors make parts of the text difficult for the reader to understand; the text does not flow; the discussion fails to justify conclusions and assertions. More than a few mechanical errors; text flows but lacks conciseness or clarity; assertions and conclusions are generally justified and explained. Few mechanical errors; text flows and concisely and clearly expresses the student’s position in a manner that rationally and logically develops the topics. None to limited minor mechanical errors; text flows and concisely, clearly and exemplarily expresses the student’s position in a manner that rationally and logically develops the topics. Weight: 25% 5. Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center Clarity, Logic, Writing Mechanics, Grammar, and Formatting Weight: 15% © Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 551 – Assignment 2 (1196) Page 3 of 3 9-606-044 REV: OCTOBER 3, 2008 RICHARD M.J. BOHMER ERIKA M. FERLINS Virginia Mason Medical Center At the turn of the millennium, Dr. Gary Kaplan, an internal medicine physician, became CEO of Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. The medical center was facing significant challenges—it was losing money for the first time in its history, staff morale was declining, and area hospitals presented ardent competition. Considerable change was imminent. Within two years, Kaplan had rallied the organization around a new strategic direction, first and foremost to become the quality leader in health care. What Kaplan and his top administrators lacked was an effective tool to execute their strategy. Soon thereafter, a series of serendipitous events led to the discovery of the Toyota Production System, a manufacturing management method focused on quality and efficiency created by automaker Toyota. Kaplan and Virginia Mason Medical Center became entrenched in a challenge: how to institute a management model previously utilized only in manufacturing into health care. Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center History of Virginia Mason In the early 1900s, two doctors shared a vision: a single place where patients could receive comprehensive medical care for virtually any medical problem. In 1920, the doctors founded an 80bed clinic with six physicians designed to offer a system of integrated health services. They pledged to provide the finest patient care by working collaboratively as a team and sought the best and brightest to join in their mission. In a remarkable coincidence, the daughters of both founders, Drs. Mason and Blackford, were named Virginia, and thus Virginia Mason began. For decades, the clinic operated as a physician partnership, a legally separate entity from the nonprofit hospital. The partnership distributed operating surplus among the physicians in an annual bonus program. Partners provided the capital and shouldered the debt burden required for clinic growth. In 1986, impelled by a need to expand services and technology, Virginia Mason restructured its organization from a physician partnership into a single nonprofit entity. The medical center sought debt financing and the physicians sold their group practice, becoming employees of Virginia Mason. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Professor Richard M.J. Bohmer and Research Associate Erika M. Ferlins prepared this case. HBS cases are developed solely as the basis for class discussion. Cases are not intended to serve as endorsements, sources of primary data, or illustrations of effective or ineffective management. Copyright © 2005, 2006, 2008 President and Fellows of Harvard College. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, call 1800-545-7685, write Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA 02163, or go to http://www.hbsp.harvard.edu. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, used in a spreadsheet, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the permission of Harvard Business School. Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center This document is authorized for use only by Ashley Murray in It’s All About the Patient at Strayer University, 2020. 606-044 Virginia Mason Medical Center When the physicians became employees of the medical center, they no longer carried the debt load nor received a share of the profits. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, the medical center was run by an internal administration with oversight by a public board, but physicians still wielded important power. Every three years, physicians elected department chairs, and every four years the CEO. Elections did not necessarily mean rampant change at the executive level; Kaplan’s predecessor, Roger Lindeman, served as CEO for almost 20 years before his retirement. In 2005, Virginia Mason Medical Center (VMMC) was a 336-bed center with over 5,000 employees and 9 locations (a main campus and 8 regional clinics). The center included a graduate medical education program and renowned research center, and its 400 physicians practiced in 45 different medical, surgical, and diagnostic fields. When Kaplan first arrived at VMMC in 1978, he described the collaborative team approach to care as “unlike anything I’d ever experienced.” Over the years, VMMC retained this unique culture that attracted Kaplan and so many others. Virginia Mason at the Millennium In 2000, Lindeman stepped down as CEO, and the physicians at Virginia Mason elected Kaplan as his successor. In November 2000, Kaplan and the board decided to eliminate the electoral process for appointing leaders within VMMC. Instead, the CEO appointed department heads, and the board would assume responsibility for selecting the next CEO. Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center Daunting challenges faced the leadership team, primarily economic: in 1998 and 1999, the medical center lost money for the first time in its history—double-digit millions, no less—and staff morale was low as a result. Competition was fierce in Seattle; VMMC was located in an area of the city known as “pill hill,” which included several hospitals within a one-mile radius. Before Kaplan assumed the role of CEO, in response to the economic downturn, the medical center had begun trimming costs, for example cutting academic spending for travel time, research and the like. As Kaplan explained, “When academics start going by the wayside, the people you want to retain start questioning whether they want to stay.” Within the first six months of Kaplan’s tenure, in attempts toward recovery, the medical center sought to consolidate less profitable business lines and grow highly profitable lines. They closed the obstetrics program and several satellite clinics, reduced mental health provider services, renegotiated contracts with payers, and examined productivity by service lines. “However, we just weren’t satisfied with the long-term economic sustainability of the traditional management initiatives,” explained Kaplan. “We needed more.” Furthermore, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) had recently issued a report on patient safety that jarred the health-care industry when it claimed: “Experts estimate that as many as 98,000 people die in any given year from medical errors that occur in hospitals. . . . Add the financial cost to the human tragedy, and medical error easily rises to the top ranks of urgent, widespread public problems.”1 The safety challenges facing health care combined with VMMC’s financial difficulties were daunting. “I had serious concerns about our long-term survival,” recalled Kaplan. “In our current state, we weren’t able to evolve in response to the rapidly changing environment. We change or we die. It was as simple as that.” Physician Compact One of Kaplan’s early moves as CEO was the initiation of a physician compact. The concept of a compact was simple: an explicit deal between two parties, in this case the physicians and the VMMC 2 This document is authorized for use only by Ashley Murray in It’s All About the Patient at Strayer University, 2020. Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center Virginia Mason Medical Center 606-044 organization. Historically, physicians assumed an implicit compact when joining physician practices like VMMC. Kaplan described the old deal: The implicit compact was about entitlement, protection, and autonomy. By virtue of joining the group, each physician felt, “I’m entitled to patients, I’m protected from the environment by the administrators, and I can do whatever I want, whenever I want to—I’m a professional.” That was the premise upon which I joined this group practice back in the 1970s, and most of my colleagues would say the same. Kaplan enlisted the help of Jack Silversin, a leading health-care consultant whom Kaplan had heard speak at conventions around the country. Silversin, who worked with VMMC on their compact, generalized Kaplan’s observations to the entire industry, “Being a doctor has traditionally meant: be the best doctor you can, however you can. It’s difficult to take highly trained professionals and tell them how to do things—that contradicts their professional identity.” The problem with the implicit compact, according to Kaplan, was its inconsistency with where VMMC needed to move in the future in order to address the challenges of the industry. In September 2000, Kaplan organized an off-site retreat for all the medical staff to consider a new compact and asked Silversin to facilitate the discussions. Of the 400 physicians, approximately 230 attended the highly emotional retreat. “Morale was low,” recalled Silversin. “Doctors felt a great deal of loss. The discussion of how the implicit compact needed to change triggered a lot of feelings, which in turn allowed most to move forward and engage in creating a different compact.” Upon their return, Kaplan designated a committee, composed primarily of frontline physicians with administrative support, to create an explicit physician’s compact. The committee solicited input from the entire organization and went through several iterations before finalizing the compact. This highly collaborative, iterative process took over 12 months. When the physician’s compact was completed, leaders and managers created their own compact. The new compact indicated that physicians and the organization had adopted the new goals of the organization: becoming the quality leader by focusing on the patient, working together, and embracing change (see Exhibit 1 for compact).Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center. To embed the compact into the organization, Kaplan tied its principles into the performance review and incentive compensation system. For example, all physician performance reviews undertaken by the chiefs of service included an evaluation of “group effort,” and 10% of the distributed dollars (although not necessarily 10% of an individual physician’s compensation) were tied to a physician’s group effort and “professional action.” Metrics included in the group effort component included relationship with and respect for other members of the care team, embracing evidence-based practice, and participating in organizational change and improvement. A Strategic Plan Throughout 2001, board members and executives at VMMC, with input from all levels of the organization, concentrated on creating a strategic plan. The strategic plan focused on putting the patient (the customer) first and created a new vision: to become their industry’s quality leader (see Exhibit 2 for final strategic plan). VMMC’s vision was clear, but it lacked a system to achieve this goal—until a serendipitous meeting led to the discovery of the Toyota Production System (TPS). Assignment 2: Case Study – Virginia Mason Medical Center In early 2001, Virginia Mason president Mike Rona sat on an airplane next to John Black, who brought TPS to the large airplane manufacturer Boeing. Rona was intrigued by TPS and believed it was just the tool for VMMC. “It 3 This document is authorized for use only by Ashley Murray in It’s All About the Patient at Strayer University, 2020. 606-044 Virginia Mason Medical Center seemed perfect at every level,” remembered Rona. “Why wouldn’t it work?” He brought the idea back to Kaplan, who was immediately taken with the similarities between VMMC’s goals and Toyota’s—especially putting the customer first, a focus on quality and safety, and a commitment to employees. Toyota Production System2 In 2004, Japanese automobile maker Toyota surpassed legendary Ford Motors to become the world’s second-largest manufacturer of cars and trucks.3 Toyota consistently ranked high in quality, dependability, and value. Over the years, the Japanese auto giant had transformed the Ford assembly-line system into a manufacturing miracle that had long been hailed as the source of Toyota’s consistently outstanding performance: TPS. TPS evolved in the post-World War II era, when the need for severe cost-cutting in a failing economy challenged Toyota … Purchase answer to see full attachment Student has agreed that all tutoring, explanations, and answers provided by the tutor will be used to help in the learning process and in accordance with Studypool’s honor code & terms of service . Get a 10 % discount on an order above $ 100 Use the following coupon code : NURSING10

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